My Adventure on cycling with Toddler

My husband is Dutch and you would probably known why & how  Dutch are naturally born cyclists. I mean, they learn to cycle the moment they learned to walk and run. Believe me,there’s no kid in the Netherlands without a children’s bike! Maybe not everyone has a computer but really, statistically speaking, every single person has a Bike. A humble Dutch Bike.

There is no such a thing as cycling culture for Dutch, It is their #1 CULTURE! It’s no surprise that they are the  Cycling capital of the world  especially  Amsterdam. If you are a tourist, please,please think twice before you hop on to that bike. Amsterdam is one hell of a crazy hub for cyclists.They rule this city and you as a tourist is a liability in the road. Your selfie stick & bike is not just a perfect combo during rush hours. But if you wanna piss off the Dutch, go on. If you’ve visited the Netherlands, you know what I mean. For me,one thing that lingers in my memory about Amsterdam is Bikes. Millions of Bikes.

There is not a single space or place without a bicycle. There are more bicycles than residents in The Netherlands and in cities like Amsterdam and The Hague up to 70% of all journeys are made by bike. They don’t cycle for recreational purposes only–They cycle for life!

No wonder that the Dutch people are on top (3 km) in cycling kilometers per day while Germans cycle only for 800 meters average daily  compared to other European countries. The Dutch also have the least deaths (1.6) per 100 million kilometers. They don’t even wear helmets! You can check out these surprising statistics Here.

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A Family that cycle together, stays together.His, hers, and Mine.

So, being married to a Dutch, this is a major culture shock for me. The things is, I’ve never  heard about or seen  a Bakfiets before, so I was really ogling the moment I saw it. Not that I wanted to have one, but the idea of transporting another human (let alone babies & toddlers!)   with that box-type cargo thing attached on the bike looks so strange to me,so crazy,so genuine & yet very interesting.Knowing you can also put your bag of groceries and your pets, your plants etc. in there, then that made me smile.When you’re in Holland, you will cycle…because that’s how they roll.

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My new found Love-Affair with Toddler-Cycling.

Eventually, cycling is also part of our little family now. I learned to cycle when I was about 13 (or something I can’t really remember), but it was just for recreation, a time where you just want to experiment new things in your teenage life. After years & years, I have never ridden a bike.The next time I rode a bike was when I was in the Netherlands and cycle for about 25 km and my ass really hurts. It felt strange, but once again, exciting.My daughter who just turned 2 last August got her walking bike and I could see that it’s in her genes too, loving her bike for the love of it! When we moved here in Germany, I was also surprised that Cycling is also a great part of the German culture, almost similar to the Dutch. Here they have the Anhänger (or kid’s chariot) and the Kid seat (Kindersitz) attached to the bike when cycling with babies & kids.People cycle with their kids, to go to work,doing errands,even when it rains! Trust me, if you move to Germany, you will buy a bike!

My husband got me a bike as well. Hoorraayyy!  I am a trying-hard Expat Mama who wanted to integrate and fit in as much as possible so I was really thrilled when we got my new bike. Deep inside I was horrified,nervous and saying prayers. Can I really do it? Can I really ride my bike with my daughter on my back, with me? What if she fell? She sits and I cycle? I tell you, it’s no joke! It scared the hell out of me. But at the same time, challenged me.

I just got to do it, and go for it.

It’s not easy at first. But it felt good. It actually felt great. Toddler-Cycling is possible and very safe. I think it really creates a special bond between families. Responsible Cycling  as a family is one of the things I love here in Germany, and why not, it’s so much fun.

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Our bicycles- meet Helmut, Helga & my daughter’s bike-Heike

I have never realized that Cycling could be so much more than just cycling itself. When I saw how Dutch people and the Germans now go on with their life through life in two-wheels, I was really  impressed. Cycling is healthy, pollution-free, natural, and very environment-friendly form of exercise and means of transport. But more than all of these, It’s a great lifestyle. No wonder these countries have high quality of Living.

Who builds a bicycle road on a 32km-long sea dyke? One akin to a really, really long Severn Bridge, made of earthworks, tumbleweed and gulls, with a six-lane highway? Yup, only the Dutch ! To make cycling safer and more inviting the Dutch have built a vast network of cycle paths.These are clearly marked, have smooth surfaces, separate signs and lights for those on two wheels, and wide enough to allow side-by-side cycling and overtaking. As a first-timer & a tourist in the Netherlands, I find these things really delightful. Here in Germany, there are enough cycle paths for anyone to cycle until they drop. It’s a cycling paradise as well. I am so looking forward to explore so much more of this country through cycling. I am excited to cycle more with my daughter and indulge in this new lifestyle that we’re having. A lifestyle with our humble bicycles.

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Exploring Germany on a bike with a Toddler.

Germany & the Netherlands have  decent infrastructure for cyclists since there is a remarkable variety of people cycling, of all ages and from all walks of life. I saw old couples riding side by side on e-bikes on long bicycle roads between country towns. There are people in normal clothes riding in astonishing numbers in the cities at rush hour. There are parents with kids, sometimes one on the front, one on the back, even kids sitting on Bagagedrager  and holding nonchalantly on to the cycling adult’s shoulders. There are children cycling unaccompanied to and from school, and cycling and playing in the streets, even in busiest cities. Children who goes to Kindergarten (or Krippe) and Pre-schoolers are riding their Bikes. I saw ladies in skirts & heels cycling in style..so fashionable. I was really dumbfounded, why this can’t be done in the Philippines?! This could be a part of the solution of the worst traffic in Metro Manila. If only the government is willing to invest in the cycling infrastructure….If only they could also fall in love with Bikes &  have a steady love-affair with bicycles.

Do you like Cycling?

What  activities do you share as a family?

 

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13 thoughts on “My Adventure on cycling with Toddler

  1. I applaud you for your bravery to ride such a big bike with a toddler in tow, Mama! Well done! 🙂 I think the biggest difference of riding in Germany vs the Netherlands is that no one in the NL is wearing any helmets! 😉

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  2. We also got a Kinderanhänger this summer so I can go with Nathan shoppign when the weather is nice. I try to cycle few times a week with my racer for short trips around 40km around the town here.
    I just wish the roads would be nicer here for cycling as I cant use the bicycle paths when I am on my racer (can’t keep on slowing down all the time as I go up 50km/h when the conditions are right),

    Anyhow my wife also cycles from time to time but she is not a big fan of it..

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Haha! you need to put his bike on his room,in the living room and everywhere He sees it.Then let him see you cycle and other kids cycle.It works for my daughter.
    After I think a month,she gets in her bike by herself and wants to be out cycling/walking in her bike .
    My arms got strong from carrying the bike when she just left it in the middle of the street.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sounds like fun! As well as practical and healthy. I like incorporating healthy habits into my daily routines and so I’m always a fan of stories like this! 😄 Plus, I think you’re so sweet for doing your best to do as the locals do! Expatting can be rough, for sure, but you seem to know how to enjoy the moments! 🌻

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Aw Thank you.. you really got my thoughts! Everyone is cycling here and I felt so out of place when I don’t have a bike, but then when I hop on mine with my Tot, It felt that I sort of belong. Yes, I still get stares and I still need to learn the cycle routes, but I’m getting by.
    Thank you for your always positive and encouraging feedbacks!

    Liked by 1 person

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