Wild carrot | Structure

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Nature tripping: The structure of the wild carrot { Daucus carota)

Yes, you might have noticed that I am under the spell of Greens nowadays. I am loving all plants and thought that green is really the new Black! Here in Bavaria, the southern part of Germany, I have seen such an expanse of wild fields. From exotic plants to fine greens that all my Bavarian neighbors adorns their gardens and balconies to colorful blooms, especially in Springtime! One moment I am walking in the cobbled stone streets in the Old town where the stones speaks of hundreds of years in history and for a few minutes, I am lost in the middle of a wild fields full of greens and wild flowers. I find it rather luxurious to have the best of both worlds, seeing the urban developed structures, and the virgin, raw, and natural beauty of forests surrounding our city. Take for example this wild flower we’ve seen in a field full of bushes and wild summer flowers near to a playground.

In a typical place lies a nature wonder, a sweet surprise which goes unnoticed by hurries of life.

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Spiny fruit?

Taking a closer look at this flower, from the umbellifers ,from the family of Apiaceae , the Daucus dakota, or the wild carrot. This wild child is so striking, with its well-structured seeds covered in spikes and form into a ball while the umbels are still young. When they sprout, they have the same patterns.

The umbels are claret-coloured or pale pink before they open, then bright white and rounded when in full flower, measuring 3–7 cm wide with a festoon of bracts beneath.
A solitary purple flower often occurs in the center of the umbel. After flowering they turn to seed and contract and become concave like a bird’s nest. The dried umbels can detach from the plant, becoming tumbleweeds.

Did you know that the fruit are egg-shaped with seven ribs and hooked spines which will attach to animal hair.
Daucus carota is very similar in appearance to the deadly poison hemlock but Daucus carota is distinguished by a mix of bi-pinnate and tri-pinnate leaves, fine hairs on its stems and leaves and a root which is a slightly thickened tap-root that smells like carrots.

Amazing right? I never knew that wild flowers could be so interesting as this!

What about you, have you discovered anything about nature and its structure?Or what about the wonders of 2017 Germany’s flower of the Year?

Inspired by this week’s Daily Post’s Photo Challenge |Structure

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