Rounded | Bavarian Kachelöfen

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Traditional Kachelöfen in Bavaria

Are your heaters on already?

When I first saw this thing in Abensberg, I thought its some kind of a weird corner decoration, I thought for a minute that its  just a ceramic or brick patch work, with bowls plastered to create a unique texture. I was mistaken. I didn’t know that this is a “Kachelöfen” or simply , “a heater”, a built-in  heating system in an old-fashioned way.

Very timely, as almost all of the leaves of trees are falling down outside, the cold chilly weather and the gloom arrived here in Bavaria and  “Heaters” (or Heizung in German ) are definitely essential to every home. You’ve got to have your heating system working properly if you want to survive the looongggg German winter.

The Kachelöfen  as a means of heating and a lot more dates back to the Middle Ages. Stoves  became a central part of the household, erected in the  ‘Stube’, the hub of family life. Not only did it give warmth, it was also used to dry clothes, keep food warm or even cook it in it and to sleep on a platform on top of it during the winter as was the case in Russia.In Eastern and Northern Europe and North Asia, these kachelofens (or steinofens) evolved in many different forms and names: for example the Russian Stove/Fireplace (RussianРусская печь), the Finnish Stove (in Finnish: pystyuuni or kaakeliuuni, “tile oven”) and the Swedish Stove (in Swedish: kakelugn, “tile stove” or “contra-flow stove”) associated with Carl Johan Cronstedt. The Chinese developed the same principle into their Kang bed-stove. The masonry heater has gained renewed domestic popularity recently because of its heating efficiency. No wonder that here in Bavaria, many of traditional homes still have this type of heating system.

First, the stoves were big but rather plain, but in the 14th century, the tiles were  decorated and the simple Kachelöfen often became a work of art. Castles featured elaborately carved Kachelöfen as standard equipment and masters of masonry created  pieces of great value.

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Kachelöfen in Austria

I remember from our holiday in Austria where we had the pleasure of dining in one of the restaurant in the city center, I noticed something similar to this. At first glance, you won’t see it as a heating device, but rather, again, as an eye-catching ornament built in the corner of the room. It creates such a homey atmosphere. Some can even be touched by hand. I think this looks far better than the mundane rectangular heating device in steel or cast iron that we have nowadays.

What do you think of Kachelöfen?

Would you fancy having one in your home?

This post is inspired by the Daily Post’s Photo Challenge |Rounded

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6 thoughts on “Rounded | Bavarian Kachelöfen

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