The Scribe from Utrecht

Roaming the streets of Utrecht, the Netherlands
Here is some fascinating views in the garden beside the Dom Cathedral

Guten Appetit! White sausage for Breakfast?!

Typical Bavarian Breakfast
Weisswurst, sweet mustard and a freshly baked Pretzel!

Today, 3rd of October is a national holiday here in Germany. We are commemorating the “Tag der Deutschen Einheit”or the German Unification Day. The day of coming together of Germany as one country. The time when the Berlin wall fell and East and West Germany finally reunited to become one solid nation as it is now.No more cold war. No more divisions. As the whole world know, Germany had a share of tragedies, morbid war stories and dark past. But now everything is different. It is a new Germany and became a home for many migrants, foreigners, including me. But then this post is not about history, its all about Food! Food that Germans and Ausländer like me enjoy here everyday!

So I thought of writing something about this land that became my home for the last 3 years up to now. Germany is really more than Football, great cars, castles, and Autobahn. This beautiful country has lots of worthwhile places to see, things to do and great nature and yes—lots of delicious food that meets more than the eyes and appetite!

Do you want to know another special about Germany? What do Germans eat for breakfast?

What’s in their table for breakfast?

Pretzel with butter, sauerkraut and sausages!
Always a perfect combination.Mahlzeit!!!

Beer, cheese, sausages,musli and bread, lots of dark, seedy breads; these are the staples in every German table every day. I am also a certified convert now. I have been converted into this German, or rather Bavarian diet. Believe it or not, I think I eat more bread now than I eat rice!

A typical German breakfast includes different kinds of cold cuts ( ham, bacon, salami etc.), different slices of cheese–Emmentaler, Gouda, weiss Käse ,camembert,cheddar cheese, Obazda and sweet mustard. They also love sliced veggies like paprika, cucumbers and cherry tomatoes. Of course Germans never forget to eat bread ( Brot) or Brötchen in many different sizes plus freshly bakes Pretzels! There is no other taste that I love other than Bavarian Pretzels–they are really good.With bread, they love different kinds of marmelades, spread cheeses and butter. Some people love also to eat Musli and jogurt plus sliced fruits.All of these should come with a warm cup of Coffee or tea.
Do you love the German way of having breakfast?

But do you know that somewhere down south, people eat something “unusual” before they start their day?

Is that an orange juice? apple juice? or lemonade?!
What do you think of the Beer culture of Germany?

I am living now here in Bavaria ( or Southern Germany) for almost 3 lovely years now and one thing that really caught my eye is the traditional Bavarian “Weisswurst Frühstuck“or in English we can say it as “white sausage breakfast”.

This beloved Bavarian breakfast is composed of white sausage boiled in water, lots of sweet mustard (senf) , freshly baked Pretzel and yes– would not be complete without a Weissbier ( or wheat beer!). Some omit to drink beer but normally you can always find this breakfast meal in restaurants, bakeries and during Volksfest or festivals. During weekend markets, there is always a food stall that sells these combo and it’s pretty cozy to see them eating this way. Add the fact that people here are seen in Dirndls and Lederhosen almost as often as they enjoy sitting in Beer gardens!

Guten Appetit! Typical Bavarian, Typical German. Leckeres Frühstuck!

Every country has its own delicacy when it comes to breakfast and main dishes they eat everyday. Way back home, we opt for a warm breakfast. This means our love for everything with “rice” seemed to be a normal choice. Fried rice, with sunny side up eggs and hotdogs, sometimes with “Tuyo” (dried fish) ,a cup of Coffee and a slice of mango or bananas . In Holland, I’ve learned to eat bread with “Hagelslag”or chocolate sprinkles. I remember my days in Kuwait, we eat lots of Khubz (or Arabic bread) with almost everything , of course with milk, Chai and Gahwa coffee.

Ein leckeres Frühstuck! ( A deliscious breakfast!)

What do you usually eat for breakfast?

What is the native specialty in your place?

More of the Food culture in Germany in these Posts :

The land with a thousand Sausages

870 -Year Old Historic Sausage Kitchen in Germany

Goodbye Oktoberfest, Hello Lebkuchen!

Have you enjoyed this post?

 Make sure to hit the Follow button for more Expat stories and travel stories on this Blog. If you are an Expat Mama, you might want to be featured in this Blog for our series on Expat Mamas around the World! Drop me an email at justbluedutch@gmail.com.

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Wordless Wednesday

Friendly Friday : Electric

It’s Friday once again and I can’t almost smell the weekend. Here in Germany it’s Dirndl and Lederhosen time because Oktoberfest opens this weekend! Who’s coming?!

The mood for Friendly Friday Photo Challenge calls for Electric and here’s some photos I wanna share to interpret this mood.

Have you ever been “electrified” by cool Graffiti Artworks?

I am always fan of Art, in all forms. I love painting in different mediums but not tried Spray. I think this technique requires great talent, control and electric motivation.I find Graffiti artwork very moving. It has a silent message, a radical expression I must add. It requires a lot of attention because our senses are easy to deviate from its message. Some call it only a fuzzy mess, some says it’s vandalism.

Some says it’s an aggressive way of expression. What do you think?

But then, it can move you. It catches your attention and maybe, maybe out of the blue, it can be “electrifying”.

Do you like Graffiti Art?

But I am never fan of an piss-off electric attitude.

I piss the wall {East Side Gallery, Berlin, 2019}

And yes, sometimes, it pays to have an electric attitude.

I used to wear electric shoes in Kuwait to combat sandstorms!
(Desert area, Kuwait)

Happy Friday everyone!

I piss the Wall

Berlin ,East Side Gallery { April 2019)

Just one of the random photos that I took from visiting the East Side Gallery in Berlin. The East Side Gallery is one of the fascinating place I’ve been in Berlin and I admire to the moon the artwork there. So much history, so much spirit and identity, but totally not this human behavior.

Frostbite and Silvester

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Frozen Beauty in Winter

One more day and its finally Silvester ! We are on the last stretch of 2018 and soon a brand new year comes. Silvester happens on December 31st,  the last day of the year and day before New Year. This day is observed and widely celebrated here in Germany. I don’t know why but whenever I think of Silvester, I think of something sparkling, something flashy, loud and silver or gold. In real life, this day doesn’t come as flashy and loud as it seems to be. Believe me, after New Year’s eve, the streets are quiet and people are sleeping-in, most of us are staying indoors ( or if we’re not on the road) because its cold outside and nothing much is going on. It’s also the time where frost comes and covered  the decaying branches with blanket of snow and turns everything into something nice..to look at!  It’s a beautiful sight to watch but the inner side of me screams! I don’t even feel merry and bright  anymore when I think about snow and the freezing temperatures. I don’t like the cold much and everyday I am already dreaming of Spring. Can anyone relate?

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In the mood for some Outdoor ice skating

This is  gonna be our 3rd Silvester , time flies remembering our first Silvester here,  and last year while we celebrated New Year in Austria, in the mountains where we enjoyed the views of snow-capped Alps and ogling the crystals in Swarovski in Wattens.

There’s nothing new to tell about cold German Winter weather, it’s been cold, grey, cloudy and rainy almost everyday.We have minus temps but we haven’t had a white carpet of snow that we can officially called White Christmasor Winter Wonderland. This new tradition came like a surprise to me because normally, I haven’t even heard of this, it doesn’t exist in the East, especially in South East Asia.

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Frost came into town

For the past days after celebrating not only 1 but TWO— days of Christmas,  (December 25 and 26), days went lazy, slow, unhurried and just a series of eat, sleep, make a mess days for the little one. Meeting up with friends, eating and drinking on repeat and series of brunches outside and some year-end shopping spree  keep us motivated to wait for the new year.With almost 1.5 weeks of vacation, we had to think of something to do everyday, especially to entertain the little one.I personally needed this break but with a super active 4 year old  who wakes up early and play  Lego , Cashier and shopping, we can never sleep-in for so long!

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Throwback to really sparkling crystal world of Swarovski

Anyway, if you’ve missed my post about last year’s Silvester, here’s some tiny bits of info about it. The tradition of Silvester comes from a 4th century Roman saint: Pope Silvester I (before I thought it spelled Sylvester). Besides the fact that he served as pope from 314 to 335, there’s very little information in internet about Silvester, though several legends have sprung up around his name.  One, sown in a forged account called “Donation of Constantine,” claimed that he had been miraculously cured of leprosy.

The feast of St. Sylvester—that is to say, his burial ceremony—took place on December 31, 335. When the Gregorian calendar was reformed in 1582, the last day of the year was placed on December 31st, combining Silvester’s feast day with what we now call New Year’s Eve.  Despite the shared date, most German Silvester traditions actually stem from a far older pagan celebration called Rauhnächte.

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All white and frozen
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A Silvester kind of day in Germany

Here, just after Christmas, fireworks flooded supermarkets and each one has a special offers and sale! Fireworks is legal here in Germany but it is not so frequent to see large fireworks display. I suddenly remember the Guinness World Record Fireworks display in Kuwait where my neck cramped from almost an hour of unbelievable fireworks, all for the sake of Pyromania! Here on the other hand, fireworks are enjoyed in every backyard on New Year’s eve and  really just for personal satisfaction. You don’t feel like in a competition with your neighbor of who has the loudest, grandest and probably the eardrum breaking noise.Here I observed, some are not even bothered by it because the roller shutters of the windows are already down.

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It’s not too late to enjoy the remaining Plätzchen (little Christmas cookies ) while having movie-marathons!

Large fireworks display are happening mostly in  Berlin, where most of street parties for the countdown is also held, right in front of Brandenburg Tor, or in other key cities like Hamburg or Munich. What is interesting thing about Silvester here in Germany, right after the loud noises and firecrackers, people tidy up their  own mess, they don’t leave the streets swamped with fireworks litter. But definitely no people drive their cars with dangling cans and making noises! I saw in the news that there’s even a call to lessen the fireworks display in New Year’s eve to lessen the injuries caused by it and the issue of environment protection where approx. 4,500 fine dust is bound to be released in the air in welcoming 2019.

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Take your pick— Raclette, German’s favourite way to dig in during Silvester

Many restaurants also offers  many Silvester parties. If you are guilty of all the calories you’ve been gaining from all the christmas foods, then you can just opt for Silvester snacks, which is also a norm here.  Young people who party like an animal till dawn and dance the new year away. Another common  tradition for families as well is eating a la Carté “Raclette”! I love this way of dining together with  stove range or hot-grill stove in the center of the table and every one has each own pans and  the chance to “cooked”their own meal based on their choices. This reminds me as well of Korea’s Shabu-Shabu and Fondue which is also a favourite New Year’s choice.My first Raclette experience was in Netherlands this year with my Dutch family where we have  different  cut cheeses, meat cuts, chicken shawarma  slices, würsts (sausages) , champignons ( mushroom), omelette, bacon,salads, and veggies. It is super “Gezellig” (Dutch) and “Gemütlich” (German) . These are two foreign words means “coziness, homey , warm and fulfilling” of dining or eating. As much as I want to do Raclette  when I want, I just can’t because we are only 3 in the family! Raclette though applies to big families, or if you host dinner parties or brunches during holiday season!

Another common New Year threat in Silvester and New Year is Doughnuts (Krafpen) filled up with sweet marmalade or if you’ve got lucky, you have it in mustard sauce. My wish is that Krispy Creme opens up here in Ingolstadt then we are happy! Last but not the least, if it happens that you visit Germany in Silvester or during New Year, don’t panic when people greets you with these infamous yet really unique greetings:

Wir wünschen einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr”! (We wish you a happy new year.)

” Ich wünsche einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr ! “(I wish you a happy new year.)

So , how was your year so far? Are you ready to have a good slide in 2019?

What are your unique New Year traditions in your country?

Happy New Year everyone!

Until then , Tschüss!

The beauty of Manholes [Part 2]

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Holiday greetings from Mayen near Koblenz!

It’s been a while and I apologize for lack of posts in this Blog. It’s been a busy, horribly busy year for me. But anyway, this Christmas break I have the chance to sit down and reflect and write once again. So many things had happened for the past months and I guess I just need to move on. Thank you for those who continue to comment, write and visit my Blog. Hopefully I could personally catch up on all my followers and readers!

How are you guys doing? I hope that everyone is doing well and had a wonderful holidays with your love ones.

For those who celebrates Christmas —Merry Christmas and as Germans say “Einen guten Rutsch or a wish for a great slide in the coming New Year!This is one of the great things that I did this year—to learn and speak German!

But the Dutch and Germans do it well since they have the second day of Christmas ( Boxing Day) that is December 26 to celebrate. What’s not to love about this extra day of holiday but to eat more, drink more and be merry?!

How did you guys kept yourselves busy this holiday season? As for me, here’s another sequel for my collection of Manholes—also known as drain covers!

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I am not so looking forward to snow but to seeing more creative art down on the streets

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Holiday greetings from the Mosel valley

If you read my post about “The beauty of Manholes“then you must know my fascination for water drainage. I have this  thing for looking down and set a goal to collect different images of manholes in different places and as I find it very interesting, Germany is a great place to start. These images  showed uniqueness of each place and area. Some are really distinctly creative, some are just plainly functional. But I tell you, for me, It is  always great to look down into something nice, whether its covered with snow, dirt, or leaves, mud or wet with rain.It adds a sentiment while walking on cobbled streets. For these second part of my series, I want to thank my father-in-law for capturing all the new manholes.

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Memories from the Rhein cruise tour

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Greetings from Paderborn in North Rhine, Westphalia in Germany

Soon it will be another year, how time flies. A brand new year for all of us to start new beginnings. Have you already thought about what do you want to accomplish in 2019?

What about starting a “Looking down series“?

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Looking down in Andernach, Germany

I know its human nature to look up. Gazing up on a tall building, or on a clear blue skies is something that we all do especially when we are “visitors”in a foreign land. It only takes a few seconds to look up and appreciate all the new and beautiful things that surrounds us.Same goes with looking down. You see shadow paths from yesterday, footprints and marks that tells a million stories.

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Reading about History and looking down in Koblenz, Germany

Do you also have a habit of looking down while walking?

How does the manholes in your area looks like?

Want to participate in my global project?

If you ever seen an interesting Manhole in your area, please feel free to send me a photo of it or a link so I can include it here in my list.

My goal is to collect as many as possible depending where my path leads me to.

Send me some photos in : justbluedutch@gmail.com.

I hope you find my story interesting and something to ponder about. Over here in Bavaria in Germany, sending you the best wishes for the coming Silvester and New Year!

Happy New Year to all!

Wishing you all a happy weekend…Tschüss!