Christmas trees of good wishes| Wunschbäume

“If you don’t have Christmas in your heart, you will never find it under a Tree “

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Christmas Trees of Good Wishes

Less than 2 days and it’s Christmas! The loonggg wait would soon be over…

Is your Christmas tree already up? I bet that by this time, presents were already packed too,neatly piled up under the tree and you’ve been enjoying the magical lights that is flooding your living room every night for quite sometime now.

Today was the first day of break from work and we are all good. Oh Yes, we feel good. My little family is all set to have a wonderful Christmas together, stress-free! This is what we want and what we need. We’ve been hit by the flu bug for the past weeks and we were sick but we are getting better now. The cold air outside still gives us chills but our hearts are warm, excited,and looking forward for more better days. We did some errands today , did some Christmas shopping and as I passed by the Christmas market in the city center, I pondered that tomorrow is its last day. We had fun out there and we have made great memories out of it. This time,I want to share another fascinating thing that I found out about German Christmas Markets (Christkindlmarkt), it’s about the Christmas trees of Good Wishes.

Have you heard anything like this? I tell you, it’s not your  ordinary Christmas Tree.

I just discovered another way to maximize my visits to Christmas markets, and not just collecting mugs from the Glühwein ,or buying those little presents, that is by taking a look at the Christmas Trees of Good wishes. These trees are normal pine or fir trees put up inside the market, normally located near the stage where the Giant Adventkalendar and the place where the actual carving of ‘Krippe’ is being done. Any visitor who may wish or try to decorate the Christmas trees of good wishes can do so, anytime, everyone is encouraged and welcome to participate. During this time where anybody can do a bit of reflection during the busy holidays, you can also let your own wishes be with the  four “naked”trees erected just opposite the Adventsbühne. Anyone who wishes to hang their own personal choice of ornaments such as star, straw , ball or other Christmas decoration can choose from the wide array of choices of the Baubles being sold there or you can even bring your own. After the 4th Advent weekend, the trees will be move in front of the city  town hall (Rathaus) where people can publicly admire them until the beginning of the brand new year.

 

I remember visiting the Labyrinth Garden and I saw something similar like this. It’s like the Apple Tree  , located in the center of the garden,where in you can think in silence , make a wish for another person, a time of solitude and best wishes, then hang an ornament, a memento, a special token or a symbol for your wishes.

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Christmas tree of good wishes

The Christmas trees of Good wishes is a perfect symbol for a sort of Christmas reflection. I find it meaningful to have something like this. It’s a nice way to remind us that this Advent season is also a time for reflection and to think of others and do charitable work, to be grateful, no matter what. I was personally saddened by the news of what happened to Berlin Christmas Market. Those innocent victims and the poor souls who end up being injured and traumatized by the incident. They came there to enjoy and have a great time and ended up injured,harassed, even some lost their lives. Such a tragic thing happened in a Christmas Market.No one has the right to steal our joy during this happiest time of the year and yet, things like this happened. We need to spread more love, and not hate. More good wishes, and not bitterness.

I reflect on this and thought that if wishes could have a power to change things then it is powerful. Imagine if all our silent wishes can be granted in an instant?

Do you still remember your feeling when you were decorating your Christmas tree?  What did you feel?

Excitement? Anticipation? Joy?

Worry, Fear,Hopeful maybe?

Or  or you see it only as a chore? But the thing is, only yourself knows…

” I am thinking how amazing it could be if you could  make one wish for someone in your life, or even utter a silent prayer for every ornament you hang in your tree…wouldn’t it be such a great time decorating? and how fulfilling the Tree-trimming could be …”

 

Here’s my wish for you this Christmas and for the coming New Year ;

May your heart grow three sizes this year –Love and only Love. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all of you! Looking forward to seeing you all in 2017!

~Christina

 

 

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When St. Nicholas beats Santa Claus

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St. Nicholas  dropped some presents  and stuffed into the Little one’s  boots!

I grew up adoring Santa Claus. Almost every Christmas, someone would dressed up as Santa Claus to make the occasion even more festive. The party gets more alive and kids shrieked with glee once they see him. From decorations ,cards, Christmas socks, to figurines set up  in shops, there is this heavily- bearded old man dressed in red suit  with a hat and black boots, carrying a sack full of gifts.  It has even become a tradition for kids to sit in the lap of Santa Claus and take  photos. The sight of him elevates our excitement for the great gifts that He brings. As a kid, I am also enamored to the old tale that if you have been good all through out the year, you will receive presents from Santa Claus. Santa  flies through the air on a winter night of Christmas eve  with his sleigh full of gifts pulled by  reindeer, especially  led by  Rudolf, the one with a red nose. Santa Claus climbs up to the chimney and then leave the gifts under the Christmas tree.

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My husband looks so happy when He received a gift from Sinterklaas

On the other side,my Dutch husband  grew up adoring Sinterklaas or the De Goede Sint (The Good Saint) which is the big thing for kids in the Netherlands . Sinterklaas is widely celebrated on Dec. 5th and most anticipated by Dutch  kids during December more than Christmas day itself. Sinterklaas  wears a long red cape or chasuble over a traditional white bishop’s alb and sometimes red stola, dons a red mitre and ruby ring, and holds a gold-coloured crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd’s staff with a fancy curled top. He traditionally rides a white horse. In the Netherlands, the horse is called Amerigo. Sinterklaas with his Zwarte piets roam around the neighborhood and give gifts to children.This festivity is full of Kruidnoten, Gevuldekoeken,chocolate letters, spekulaas cookies and so many different treats for the little ones. It’s really the biggest event for Dutch kids.

There are so many Santa Claus figures all over the world but I believe that they all portray the same role as the mythical Santa Claus and its connection to Christmas.But here in Germany, Santa Claus is nowhere to be found because St. Nicholas beats him. In this festive season,all German kids look forward for St. Nicholas Day or Nikolaustag on December 6, more than Christmas Day on December 25th.

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Shoes has been stuffed by St. Nicholas for Nikolaustag in Germany!

But who is the real St. Nicholas?

Across the German-speaking region of Europe there are many kinds of Santa Clauses with many different names. Despite their many names, they are all basically the same mythic character. But few of them have anything to do with the real Saint Nicholas (Sankt Nikolaus or der Heilige Nikolaus), who was probably born around A.D. 245 in the port city of Patara in what we now call Turkey.He is credited with several miracles and his feast day is December 6, which is the main reason he is connected with Christmas. In Austria, parts of Germany, and Switzerland, der Heilige Nikolaus (or Pelznickel) brings his gifts for children on Nikolaustag, Dec. 6, not Dec. 25.

So what happens during Nikolaustag in Germany?

I noticed that German kids are very very  spoiled during Christmas season here in Germany. As early as October, the shops are already filled with Adventkalendar which is literally  a calendar with chocolates , toys and sweets! German kids count the days before St. Nicholas ‘s arrival through the Adventkalendar which also coincide with the 4 weeks of Advent season before Christmas day. Around November, the shops are already adorned with Christmas decorations, there’s the wide array of different Adventkranz, and the Weihnachtsmann or  (Father Christmas )  strolls inside the shops with a sack  giving out chocolate balls and sweets for kids. He also visit the Christkindlmarkt  during Frohe festtages where there again, giving away candy bracelets, toys and chocolate balls to eager kids. One happy day for kids, and for parents too!

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St. Nicholas with the Christkind in the Christkindlmarkt

On the night of December 5th , in small communities in Austria and the Catholic regions of Germany, a man dressed as der Heilige Nikolaus (St. Nicholas)  who resembles a bishop and carries a staff) goes from house to house to bring small gifts to the children. Accompanying him are several ragged looking, devil-like Krampusse, who mildly scare the children. Although Krampus/Knecht Ruprecht carries eine Rute (a switch), He only teases the children with it, while St. Nicholas hands out small gifts to the children. In some regions, there are other names for both Nikolaus and Krampus (Knecht Ruprecht in northern Germany).  The Krampuslauf custom found in Austria and Bavaria also happens around December 5 or 6, but it also can take place at various times during November or December, depending on the community. While Santa Claus is more gay and cheerful ,take note that St. Nicholas doesn’t  even say Ho ho ho !

Now that we live in Bavaria, my daughter had her first taste of Nikolaustag. She shrieked with delight when she saw  her yellow boots is filled with goodies and gifts . Her first taste of Nikolaustag came as a bright and sweet surprise!  This experience is new to us but then I am so glad that my daughter can have things such as this. This is one of the local traditions that we are looking forward to celebrate through the coming years.

Do you believe in Santa Claus?

What Christmas traditions do you do during this holiday season?

 

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It’s not this Time of the Year without Christkindlmarkt

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Beautiful hand painted Christmas ball ornaments

The long wait is finally over!

Finally, I have made my very  first visit and seeing a real German Christmas market–the Christkindlmarkt ! The great thing about being an Expat is exploring things like a tourist and enjoying it like locals do. I am so grateful that my Expat Life had brought me so much new cultures to learn and different stories to share with you. I am sure that you’ve heard about Germany being  famous worldwide  for its beautiful Christmas markets &meaningful  traditions and now I know why…

This year is our first taste of Christmas in Germany and as I finally became a resident here, I wanna share with you my whole experience through Germany’s Weihnachten, after all, it’s  my favorite time of the year,the Christmas season.

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Christkindlmarkt in Ingolstadt

After almost 8 years of Christmas in Kuwait, where celebrating Christmas is confined into the insides of our flat, this year’s gonna be a whole lot different for me personally. I am seeing lots of new things, and various exciting things as we look forward for this holiday season. Even away from the Netherlands, my daughter is so ready to celebrate Sinterklaas version or the St. Nicholas Day (Der Nikolaustag) on Dec. 6. Again, for the first time as well, I have made our own Advent wreaths (Adventkranz) and pine wreaths which I decorated to hang in our doors. It’s so different to have a real wreaths made out of twigs and pines.Traditionally, German families gather around the wreath on each Advent Sunday to light the candle, sing Christmas carols and eat Christmas cookies. For me, I needed to pay extra attention when the candle is lit because I have a frenzy toddler who wants to play  with the pines and ehmm..blow the candles.

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Handmade, crafted and sculptured Christmas figurines and the Old man’s look.

Last Wednesday, November 23, at 5pm, the Christkindlmarkt in Ingolstadt opened with sparkling lights and putting up the giant 14- meters Christmas tree (Weihnachtsbaum)  in front of the Town Hall (Rathausplatz) signalling the start of this year’s  Frohe Festtages.The whole city center were transformed into a winter wonderland and I was really amazed by how efficient the local organizers have put up the whole set for the next 31 days. Everything looks like a page in a book of  Winter Wonderland. The Christkindlmarkt here in Ingolstadt along with all other Christmarkets all over Germany  lights up the city from November 23 up to 23rd of December 2016, some even lasts until 8th of January next year.

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A window full of ornaments I spotted in Christkindlmarkt

I was looking forward to see Ingolstädter Krippenweg. For me, it’s the  highlight of celebrating Christmas as well as Filipinos observed the “Simbang Gabi“or the Night Mass observed for 9- nights from Dec. 16-24. I remembered having our Nativity set placed under our Christmas trees. This year, we have our hand- crafted Nativity set from Kenya, a gift from my parents in-law. But here in Germany, they have  the city’s Trail of Nativity and there’s a special tour  for tourists- the “ Kumm,geh ma Kripperl schaugn” for visitors who wants to see the unique ‘cribs’ that can be found here in Bavaria.  I have seen 2 of them already  and I look forward to see the largest nativity in the Spitalkirche on the next  days. Ingolstadt is a home of  famous “cribs”as early as 1594.

Stay tuned for my detailed post about the historical cribs in different  periods and styles displayed in various places and churches  spread in this old Bavarian city and of course, the Polish artist from Opole carving the wood cribs.

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Christmas lanterns adorn the restaurants and gives warmth to outdoor lounges.

As shoppers flocked everyday in the busy city center,the shops along Ludwigstr. adorned their windows with colorful, festive and holiday displays which gives delights to all ages. The whole city is adorned with Christmas decorations . Everywhere I looked, I see  decorated wreaths and  cafes have become even more cozier with their winter lounges and warm decor. I felt like I am really in a different world. Along the streets, the little ones get crazy with the carousels (Kinderkarussell), trains (Kinder eisenbahn) and the Weihnachts Märchenweg. There are Story telling- booths with statues and moving puppets for famous fairy tale stories like “Der Frösch-Konig”, “Rapunzel“, Hänsel und Gretel”,”Rot-Käppchen”,”Schnee Wittchen” and many more. Such a fun way  to engage the little ones!

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Christmas Gingerbread cookies

Outside, I observed that most  trees gradually lost their colored leaves, some are already bare, it seems to be getting colder from day-to-day and the hedges starts to freeze. I wonder when will the first snow fall here in Bavaria? Schokonikoläuse and gingerbread have long adorned the shelves of supermarkets, a clear sign, the year is drawing to a close. I can’t believe that 2016 will soon get over…another brand new year to come.

Also I noticed that Germans ( also Bavarians ) celebrates this holiday with style and lots of Uhmm.. sweets and  threats, such as the Advenkalendar. While I was doing our grocery shopping, I noticed that there is a huge pile of these colorful boxes, some in edgy shapes, with Christmas stories and designs. The German Advenkalendar madness had begun. Germans surely have a way to spoil themselves ( and little ones!) with lots of chocolates even before the calories add up on Christmas dinners and parties! For the 3 visits we’ve made, my daughter was showered already with lots of Scholonikoläuse, bonbons, and sweets..for this I need to be tolerant. The Weihnachtsman inside the shops are so generous!

In addition to so many sweet and hearty treats, a lot of punch, mulled wine and Feuerzangenbowle, and the aroma of Glühwein (“glow wine”) are served. These drinks will warm you up even before you actually drink this German version of hot mulled wine.Germans really know how to keep the chill away.

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Ogling and drooling over these bonbons

Outside the confines of shops, this place is packed with so many great gift ideas in displays.We strolled inside the Christkindlmarkt and found many tempting food stalls. There’s the German rolls and  brötchen with sausages and Bratwurst, grilled meats in buns, or with crispy pommes, the Stollen (Fruitcake) and lebkuckens even French crepes!

There are huge stall for decorative glass wares, candles made out of beeswax, toys, arts & crafts, Christmas decor to adorn the Weinachtsbaum (Christmas tree), yummy threats like Ginger breads , Lebkucken,Schaumküsse, and lots of tortes and chocolate bonbons! My favorite was the shop with all the hand painted Christmas balls. They all looked so beautiful!

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The city was transformed into a scenic festive place as well the arcades of the old town hall, the Winterlounge opens again . An oasis of peace, where you can relax the day with a mulled wine or punch. This is also a perfect place to socialize and just enjoy a cozy night out with friends.

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Ice Skating rink in front of New Castle

The fun continues when we saw another special thing about German Christmas market-the Ice Skating rink!  The whole area of Paradeplatz were transformed into a beautiful “Eis Arena am Schloss”. Imagine skating  in front of the beautiful Neues Schloss ( New Castle), for a true magical Ice skating experience. A 500- square meter ice surface is waiting for all ice skating enthusiasts and the adventurous ones. My toddler can’t keep her eyes from this place but she’s still too young to skate with all the big ones.

Beside the Herzogkasten,the Carraraplatz is transformed into a small handicraft space. On the four adventures, artists and artisans, in Christmas-decorated huts, offer their unique products. I realized that there are so many talented artists here and so many beautiful crafts! There is also the Kulturezeit,special treat for big and small ones. The tent moves from the Schlossinnenhof to the Herzogkasten. Story-tellers, artists and authors invite young and old to join in and listen.

What about you, how’s Christmas celebrated in your place? Have you ever tried Glühwein ?

So much already right? Germans really have a way to make every Weihnachten the best holiday time of the year and as an Expat, I can really say that “It’s not this time of Year without Christkindlmarkt”.

To think it’s only the first week,and  I bet there’s more to come. I will share them all in my next posts so  stay tuned for more  about celebrating Christmas the German way.

This post is in response to this week’s Photo challenge |It’s Not This Time of Year Without…

Bavaria in 100 days!

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Picture perfect German childhood : Bavarian kids in Dirndl and Lederhosen

2016 was a year of changes for me and yes,today , is my 100 day-mark  living as an Expat in Germany.

Last summer,we have successfully  touched down & settled in our new ground. We have a decent place to live, a garden of which my daughter is so happy to roll over everyday,  a 5- minutes walk and we’re standing in the middle of the woods, with  lots of nearby playgrounds and finally living-out our European dreams! I call it  European-dream for myself– because this is actually my first time to  live in Europe. I tell you, it is so different from being a visiting tourist compared if you are an Expat living here. If you are an Expat -Mama relocating to Bavaria, you should read this for you know that Germany has wonderful pros for raising your kids. Here in Bavaria, it has so many playgrounds for children and the education system is of global competence. Something that I would really love my daughter to have.

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The colors of Fall 

So forgive me if I flood my Blog with things that are all new to me. Only with 2 months of preparation, we left Kuwait , sold our furnitures, sent our important stuff to Germany and moved to Bavaria.You can imagine my overwhelmed self when I saw how life is different from Kuwait compared to here. Talking about the efficient public transport system, did I mentioned that its my first time to ride in a German ICE (Deutsch Bahn high speed train ) and my daughter totally loved it?!

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German breads, dark and dense and oftentimes have seeds.There are over 1,200 varieties of Brötchen and loafs that you can see here in Germany.

Everywhere I look, it’s all new and different for  me. Almost everyone is fair & blonde, Deutsch is a strange  language in my ears, the amount of sausages, the dark breads, the overwhelming calcium in the water, and who won’t be intrigued with volk musik and festivals?  For the first time in my life, I have cycled with a tiny human behind me in two-wheels, and it felt terrifying,at the same time a total new experience for me. Yes, we managed to get home in one piece,safe and sound!

Everyday is a step to slowly integrating into German living. I even managed to learn some German in slow-phase and helping me to stay sane.

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My first taste of Volkfest…also the first time I tasted the Bavarian beer..so far,so good!

Everyone is so comfortable with cycling around as the easiest mode of getting around, to work, to do errands, or just getting active in any time of the day. Where else can you see people who shop in their wooden baskets and carries tons of bottles for recycling?Germans drink more sparkling water than tap water. Yup yup,only in Germany.

I’m happy I can stay out  for hours without the soles of my shoes burning. Finally a decent temperature, well at least for now. Ever the air that I breathe is new to me. It felt clean and friendly to my lungs. I love the German way of protecting their environment and keeping everything in order. I haven’t even heard cars honking, only rings from the cyclist! Sorry Kuwait, you’re so  fine,I missed the Baklavas and dates, but I had enough of dust storms and honking maniac drivers.

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Lederhosen  and the Volk music, It’s totally a Bavarian thing.

I can’t think of a better way to mark this day but by listing out things I have seen within 100 days of living here..but first, let me tell you first a bit of something about this place called “Bayern “.

Bavaria–  is the region in the southeast part of Germany . Close enough to Austria & Switzerland , Czech Republic & France. The largest city in Bavaria is Munich or München ( and also third among most-populated city  next to Hamburg & Berlin) and  is the center of Beer festival known as ‘Oktoberfest‘. I thought it was just a get-wasted with beer festival  but realized that  it’s more than  that. Excuse my poor mind!

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Beautiful gardens and parks

1.Bavaria is Green.

It’s always been my  dream to live in a place which have  a city vibe & modern and yet with a foremost country-living feel. This is where Bavaria falls into. Ingolstadt is a city surrounded with vast green, it is so verdant that you always have a reason to spend the day outdoors. Historical old towns surrounded with green  forests, medieval fortresses, beautiful architecture and lush gardens, you name it, it’s here. From hiking in the or cycling in the forest you can be in cobbled stones within 20 minutes. Bavarians love their nature and enjoy it relentlessly. I felt so close to nature here. I feel lucky that it’s always within my reach.

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German women in Dirndl

2.Bavarians love their National costume with pride.

How often did you wear your country’s national costume or dress?

I cannot even recall for myself. Maybe only once, at school loooong time ago!But in Bavaria, it is different. They wear it as often as they drink beer and there’s a sense of pride when they wear their ‘Tracht I’. thought I was still dreaming when I saw men in Lederhosen and pretty  women in Dirndl in the crowded streets in Munich and so much more here in Ingolstadt. Before I only saw them in internet and now I see them before my eyes. I need to pinch myself sometimes to be reminded that they were real. I am so surprised by just how strongly the locals kept to their traditions, and just how many walked around wearing traditional Lederhosen looking so comfy, with knee-high socks and alpine hats, on a daily basis. From the young kids to the old ones.

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Germans enjoying an open air classical music concert  with Toddlers, bottle of wine and everything.
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The view of the city and the majestic Cathedral, Liebfrauenmünster from the historical tower,Pfeifturm.
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A distinct Architecture  gable roof detail typical in Bavaria

3.Bavaria have Old, historical & beautiful beautiful Churches 

I love beautiful architecture and visiting old churches. It has so much history in there and always a great work of art. Here in Bavaria, they have a unique culture, more of being a conservative ones since most are Catholics ( 52%). This explains why they have so many beautiful Baroque, Gothic and Renaissance churches, all in the same place.

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Baggersee reflections in Summer

4.The best beer in the world is here. The liquid gold from Bavaria.

Even if you’re not a beer-drinker, you’ve got to love the Bavarian’s cozy way of relaxation. Enjoying a mug of beer after a hard day at work is the best form of solace. Biergartens are not only for Beer drinkers but have become an attraction for all ages.Have you heard about Biergarten having a play yard adjacent to it? It’s true.

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I am not a Beer drinker but I can say that Bavarian beer is good. Prost! { Volkfest in Ingolstadt }

Bavaria  is  regarded as a wealthy region, and people tend to take time to enjoy themselves. And the best way to enjoy is to sit in a cozy Biergarten ,to meet with friends, or just have a night out with your partner. It’s a lifestyle. The ‘Reinhetsgebot‘ (or the Bavarian Beer Purity law) which can be traced since  1516 originated in Bavaria. On average, a  typical Bavarian consumes from birth to the grave some 150 litres (40 gallons) of beer per year  so it’s no surprise that  Bavarians are at top of the beer consuming list of states in Germany.

What is the best way to show their undying love for beer? through Oktoberfest  and Volksfest of course! In our neighborhood itself, I found 3-4 Biergartens.

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A place where you can see old-gabled buildings and houses well-preserved . An architectural detail that is almost evident as you walked through the old town.

5.Bavaria is the birthplace of many innovations, famous people and events.

There is so many things that can be associated with Bavaria. Just like everyone loves a good pair of sneakers, but did you know that Adidas was founded by the Bavarian, Adolf “Adi”Dassler? while his other brother, Rudolf Dassler founded Puma. Famous Bavarians include Pope Benedict XVI, Richard Wagner, Richard Straus, Thomas Mann, Levi Strauss, and Rudolf Diesel to name a few.  If you’re a football fan I’m sure you know  Bayern Munich, which is the most successful team in the Bundesliga , and having won  European Champions League four times (1974, 1975, 1976, 2001).

Should I add having one or two of the best luxury cars in the world? 

Bavaria has the largest economy in all Germany. This Bavarian pride comes being the Headquarters of car giants BMW (Bayerische Motoren Werke AG)   in Munich and Audi AG in Ingolstadt.  Bavaria is the  region of one of the best-selling cars around the world! Anyone visiting Bavaria should visit the BMW Welt in Munich  and the Audi Forum in Ingolstadt to see just how big these giants are. Really recommended for car-lovers!

Bavaria has a good standing when it comes to economy. So I am not surprised why this region is a magnet for Expats. Aside from having an affordable cost of living, the quality of life is high.

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Architecture in the old city of Ingolstadt

6.Best of both worlds for Expats

Bavaria offers great opportunities for Expats and their families. Even expat kids have financial allowance given by the German government and not to mention the Integration class with encouragement to learn the language for better integration to their culture. This is what Bavaria is. A place of new opportunities and culture-learning so an Expat doesn’t feel a forever Alien. My experience in the Rathaus ( City Hall) is very pleasing.The immigration process and paperwork for an immigrant like me is very tedious and yet, systematic. The locals are very friendly and  accomodating. Contrary to what they say that Germans are cold, I find them rather open and very kind.

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A wurst in a bun! 

Ah yes,lastly, after contemplating about living in Bavaria for the last 100 days, who can’t be intrigued with their food? A sausage in a bun for snack,lunch or dinner. Indeed, welcome to Germany!

 

Are you an Expat too? What part of another culture is hard for you to get used to?

 

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Kindsbaum and Stork

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Only in Bavaria : Kindsbaum and stork

Last month while I was walking through our neighborhood, I spotted this Stork wood post and suddenly, my husband told me that They’ve got a new baby!” I asked, “How do you know?” and he said that it is an old tradition not only in Bavaria but also in some European countries  like Holland. It is a common sight to put the stork pole in front of the yard or garden of the family who had a new baby.In the beak stork holding a baby in a diaper fixed. A blue ribbons to the diaper means that a boy is born, a pink bow for a girl. Quite similar to  Dutch baby traditions just without the infamous Geboortekaartje (Birth card )  and Beschuit met Muisjes.

It is indeed clear that a happy event took place in this house. A very proper way of announcing to the whole neighborhood, right?

 

The other day, I went on another street and again,  found another familiar wood Stork ,  this time it was a bit different because it has some accessories such as the baby clothes of a girl and a boy.

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Kindsbaum: Only  in Bavaria

Kindsbaum or also known as Stork ( Storch) pole is a traditional way of announcing the arrival of babies in Germany. Especially in southern Bavaria, it is customary to set up a so-called child tree for the wedding (in some regions it is called wedding tree). It is about a 5 to 10 m long, white-blue painted trunk, be suspended from the “branches” various baby stuff (bodysuits, pacifier, bottle, etc.). Usually a stork is mounted at the top of the child harness. In addition, located at the bottom of the tree at eye level a blackboard with a poem in which the newly married couple is reminded of his duty to bring to the world within a year. The setting up of a child tree is a particularly beautiful tradition that is lived mainly in southern Bavaria, and always a wonderful surprise for the wedding couple.

 

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“You have One year to make a Baby, If there is no one after one year, then you have to make a Party for your friends “

So after a year and the couple haven’t had a baby yet, their friends will show up on their wedding anniversary and they are obliged to throw a feast,let’s say  maybe 15 liters of beers ,sausages,and other threats. Pretty simple right?

If Stork bird symbolizes birth & Fertility here in Germany then  what happened to the Stork population  knowing it’s the only country in Europe which  has drastically declining child-birth & has a low birth rate same as Japan? Did the stork migrated to India, Philippines & China? Germany needs more Babies, it’s very clear in statistics and not a mythical opinion.

 

 

Have you had any  experience of unique Birth traditions?

Did I miss anything from this post? please feel free to comment below, I would love to hear it.

 

 

O’zapft is ! my first Volksfest experience

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My first Volksfest experience as an Expat

Finally, I had my first taste of Oktoberfest!

Oktoberfest is the largest of Volksfest celebrated in the whole of Germany ( and of the world) along with travelling carnival and fun fair. For the neighboring cities around Munich,each one has their unique Volksfest. Since 1946,  Ingolstadt had its first festival after  WW II, and from then on ,there are two major festival to celebrate. One in Spring and one in Fall. I had always been curious what is all about Oktoberfest and all these hustle and bustle about beer.  I am not a beer drinker but having been able to see how this beautiful festival is celebrated is probably one of the highlights of my days living as an Expat in Germany.

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Parade highlights -there are 93 group delegations who joined the parade.

If you are visiting Germany, you’ve gotta love this! The whole place is so alive and  flooded with colorful people wearing their traditional Lederhosen and Dirndls waslking in the festive vibe of Volk musik.

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Highlight of this year’s festivities is 500 years of the Bavarian Beer Purity Law!

Last Friday, September 23, the Volksfest in Ingolstadt started and will last until 3rd of October. As the renowned legendary and traditional ritual of tapping the first barrel of Oktoberfest-beer is one of the things that I really looked forward to see, by my own eyes.There is something great about seeing it for real compared to the ones that I only saw in internet. Since 1972, Volksfest in Ingolstadt  is held in Volksfestplatz just beside the ZOB.

Volksfest with a toddler? No problem!

Aside from no entrance fee,Volksfest is for the entire family. I was having doubts how would  my daughter would behave during this time because of the crowds  and the volk-musik was continously played by the stage band. I was quite surprised that  Volksfest is kid-friendly. There is something about a father & daughter sharing food, and old couple happily enjoying lunch, and of course, sharing a mug of beer. Volksfest is defintely a disabled-accessible,most especially with people with disabilities and in wheelchairs.

We managed to find the big tent where the tapping of the first barrel of beer would be held. This is known as  the “Schottenhamel” beer tent. I found a very nice place directly in front of the beer kegs but my daughter started to get bored and whining. But even if I had to change my position after my husband take her, I still managed to get an arm’s length from the spot were the barrel will be tapped.Soon, the Mayor Dr. Christian Lösel and his entourage arrived and  began the ceremony.

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Inside the tent filled with happy Germans drinking and enjoying a nice,cold Beer.
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O’zapft is!!!

As usual, the first thing He spoke into the microphone was “O’zapft is!” ( “It is tapped!”) and wished everyone a peaceful celebration of Volksfest. As protocol demands, the first mug of beer was passed on  and with that all the other beer tents could start selling beer as well.

Volksfest has officially started!

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Our first mug of Bavarian Beer! Prost!

Volksfest star of the festivities is the Beer. And oh, the famous Bavarian beer. They’ll serve it to you in a size smaller than a Maß (which is one liter, same as the one in above photo) but if you order anything smaller you’ll be mocked, so don’t. You can also get Radler (half-beer, half-lemonade), water, and soda, but drinking those things is what all the other days of the year are for. Unless you’re a recovering alcoholic! In which case the water and soda are great and Oktoberfest is probably not that fun for you! Waitresses your grandmother’s age will be carrying eight or ten Maß at a time, which is impressive.

 

Talking about food?  You will drool at the sight of food during Volksfest. Order Münchener Weißwurst immediately! Since we are in Bavaria, we soothed our taste buds with threats that is definitely the food for the gods at this time.

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My favorite so far is the simple Bratwurst ,fries, and of course,my daughter’s Bretzel! The size of the Pretzel is so huge that we only share a piece. From the cheeses,breads,sausages, roasted chicken, pork slices and grilled meats were also among the favourites. The smell of the food stalls are just heavenly!

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Old time favorite. Curry wurst with pommes. A perfect combination with Beer.

Outside was a place of colorful Carnival. One of the highlight was the  daring roller coasters, giant Ferris wheel which goes high as 40 meters  and gives you rare views of the whole city, children’s carousel, and so much more.  I’ve heard that this year, a number of rides were new such as  the “Spinning Coaster”, Rollercoaster Crazy Mouse, the rapid jungle giant swing Konga with an altitude of 45 meters and a maximum speed of 120 kilometers per hour, also 4G gravity. All not my kind of fun and not for the faint-hearted! Just looking at it makes me sick, but for others, it is sure a thrill-filled ride.Me and my daughter enjoyed our very first train ride and it was absolutely fun!

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Train ride for kids!
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Pretty ladies in Dirndl.

The whole fair ground was a full of  families, young & adults enjoyed a week-long festivities. It’s not just about drinking beer. It’s a whole more than that. A true legacy that defines German character and culture. Through the years, beer culture of Germany have been attracting so many tourists and now I know why.

I was even more impressed that the security was heightened by checking the bags,the strollers and there are always roaming guards to ensures public safety.Inside the tent was a no-smoking policy is observed and everything is in order even the public bathrooms. Animals are also  not allowed inside the Volksfestplatz.

 

Have you had a taste of Oktoberfest?

How was your experience?

Have you enjoyed reading this post? If so, make sure to follow the button below to read more on my Expat life . Let’s get friends, are you on Twitter? If you’ve enjoyed this post then make sure to follow my Twitter page and my Instagram page for updates on my Expat Life in Bavaria.

 

 

Why German women are sexy

Yes, you read that right. German women are sexy, and you want to know why, that’s why you’re in this page & want to read , right?

I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt.

Who says being ‘Sexy‘ need to be complicated. It doesn’t need an elaborate description or a bare-it-all image for you to understand. German women are sexy in their own special, and in their very ‘Au Naturel ‘way. German sexiness doesn’t come by wearing the sky-high stilettos, plunging necklines, tight & form-fitting short dresses and red lipstick. After seeing them everyday, I realized that sexiness isn’t all about baring and flaunting and it is not always the best look.

I hereby declare that these type of shoes are the most Un-German ladies shoes in Germany.

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Beautiful and fashionable , but probably the most Unfriendly shoes that German women prefer. On special occasions, perhaps.

Tell me how in the world can you walk for hours in cobbled streets with these?

Back then in Kuwait, I saw Kuwaiti women always dress in style a.k.a Flaunting and Killing it. Well, there’s nothing wrong about it actually. Muslim women also dressed up in modesty. Women in general ( myself included!) can’t resist to  designer  bags, shoes, accessories or even the line of make up . The overwhelming  mall culture of Kuwait have boomed so much that you can see locals plunged into every bit of fashion statements that is in trend and what’s in around the global fashion. Women that are dressed up in modest Abayas are wearing sky-high stilettos, rocking the heels & wedges while grocery shopping, and full-made-up face while drinking coffee. A day in the life of an Araba is spent in the Avenues, salons ,spas and lounging in coffee shops , clothed & accessorize with LV, Prada and Louboutins. The epitome of a sexy, modern, Kuwaiti women.

In Germany, I saw something different.

German women on the other hand, typically the Bavarian women that I’ve seen, dress conservatively and practical. Instead of luxurious bags & purses, they often carry backpacks. Instead of designer coats, they dress practically in Jack Wolfskin , North Face, or Schöffel . Trading off their stilettos  for decent, comfortable and most durable shoes everyday. Do you know Adidas & Puma? They are an icon of street wear here and of course, it’s a German brand, and founded by Bavarians.

They may not looked all dolled-up everyday, but who cares,even sans make-up, they are already envied by the whole world for their features ,fair skin and oh well, they are Germans!

Why in my opinion that German women, especially here in Bavaria deserves this remark  as a compliment , Here are my  top 5 reasons ;

1.They cycle in style and it’s Sexy

German women can really make an impression while cycling. I love the first time I saw a German lady cycling in a full dress and sandals.Her bike is adorned with little flowers and on the back side is a wooden basket with a loaf of Bread popping out and a bunch of flowers.While women here are very good in cycling in speed, they are also great in multi-tasking. Watch how a mother swirl with her child’s carrier along the woods and you will know.She transmits a lot of self-security  to her children because she is full of confidence herself.

Have you ever seen a pregnant woman cycling in stride as if its their normal breathing? Yes, only in Germany.

Do you know why old German ladies never gets boring to watch? Just look how she struts in her bike wearing  her  Pashmina  (scarf) and hat.Growing old is not an excuse for not being active and not hopping the two-wheels.

2.They go out, get fit  and enjoy nature and it’s Sexy

Bavarians love to enjoy life. They loved to go hiking or cycling on weekends & holidays. Compared to honking of cars in Kuwait, here in Bavaria, the first sound that I hear that I knew its a great day is the sound of cyclists. Women are no exception.Dressed up in track suit, shorts and comfy shoes,they run and jog,every single day. We lived next to a sports club and I saw German women doing sport just as they drink beer in the Biergarten in the late afternoon. German mothers takes her children for a swim in the swimming pool or just trek into the woods. Instead of spending hours in a mall or salon, they prefer to go outdoors and sweat out.

3.They make it, instead of buying it and it’s Sexy

German women are crafty and artistic. They love crafts and everything in it. It’s a good indication how they manage their time doing this stuff aside from doing their jobs and having kids. I saw so many handmade cards, home-made goodies, cakes & pastries, and self-done craft work like quilts, crochet,and artwork all made by German ladies. My mother-in-law who is Dutch, was a great Crafter too, she likes to make hand-made cards and we have those in every single special occasion,from the moment I got married, when my daughter was born, up to the time we moved into our new place. Everything is personalized. Our neighbor whom I befriended gave us a handmade card too for my daughter’s birthday and I find all these gestures so warm.This European domesticated syndrome is a great thing.

4.They are strong, doing a man’s job & still, they are Sexy

Have you ever ride a bus in Germany? or a delivery truck,  or  have you ever seen Forklifts & Bulldozer and other heavy machine operators doing the road work & tunnels in Bavaria?

Or do you have a Taxi experience in Germany?

From the world I came from, these type of jobs mentioned above are done mostly by men, but not in Germany. German women shows that they can do tough jobs as men does.Here in Bavaria, I have seen German women doing all these jobs. With their blonde hair and still active physique, they just do it as good as men does.

And lastly, since we are talking about Germans;

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Just imagine Oktoberfest without women in Dirndls and mugs of beer! /Photo credit to mail Online 

5.They drink Beer and stay sober. Even one of the boys, they are still  Sexy!

I’m not talking about the wasted moments where ladies  get drunk  from too much beer and dragging themselves in the bathroom. I’m talking about German women who knows how to enjoy life, and knows exactly  what she wants.

What is your definition of sexy?

 

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Frankenstein in Ingolstadt

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Ask any kid during Halloween of which character  they wanna be and it is for sure that one of them would shout   ‘Frankenstein’. Do you know Frankenstein?

Now who would not know this monster, I think everyone does because  it’s as famous as Mickey mouse ,Olaf and Winnie the Pooh. Although this 8 ft. monster is not always favored by babies and toddlers because of its scary face and humongous built, it is for sure a favorite among Halloween parties. Frankenstein the monster becomes a world-wide enigma  and is a part of any childhood ( even adults!)  since numerous movies and world literature were adapted based on this novel.

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I admit that I knew Frankenstein myself, but I never ever imagine that I would live in the place where the setting of this gothic novel is based upon.When I found out about this, I was definitely itching to explore and visit the Álte Anatomie’  in Anatomiestrasse 18-20 in the old city of Ingolstadt. I thought, it could be in Holland , Austria , Switzerland or somewhere else in Europe, but why in Ingolstadt?

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Old Anatomie  Building

Did you know that Ingolstadt is the Birthplace of Frankenstein?

Not many knew but the Frankenstein novel was written by English author Mary Shelley in 1818. From a chapter in her book ,she had named the place where she created the character of Victor Frankenstein  in Ingolstadt, here in Bavaria, Germany . Basically, Frankenstein is the name of the mad Doctor who created this monster,and not the monster itself. Eventually, it becomes his identity. For a fact that Shelley has never been to Ingolstadt, and the University is no longer existing during the period that she wrote the novel.This is what I find quite interesting.

Why Ingolstadt?

This is because Ingolstadt holds a unique and great story that not everyone knows.I myself didn’t know of this , only after I visited the Old Anatomy Building that I’ve learned some fascinating facts that relates to Shelley’s writing.

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Mary Shelley,Author of Gothic novel’Frankenstein’

Do you know about the Illuminati? I only learned about this when I read about Dan Brown’s novels. The University of Ingolstadt produces Johann Adam Weishaupt, a German philosopher, born in Ingolstadt, who gained a Doctorate degree at the age of 20 in 1768. Weishaupt founded in 1776 the academic secret society which included “Illuminati”, the Goethe, Knigge, Herder, Pestalozzi and many other sizes of German intellectual life in the Age of Enlightenment and also Mary’s husband – the famous poet Percy Bisshey-Shelley. Think about a place of thinkers & revolutionaries!

On a closer look, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is  the story of Victor Frankenstein, who study Chemistry  in the University of Ingolstadt . This renowned university was first opened on July 26, 1472, which from that time was  considered to be the medical and scientific center of whole Europe. Ingolstadt university housed the principal establishment specializing in anatomy and biology, The Ingolstadter Alte Anatomie (or the Old Anatomy Building). It has the ultimate “Experimental Building” for medical & scientific research from 18th century! For these reasons, Ingolstadt is the perfcet place for a setting of a Sci-Fi horror novel.

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The Alte Anatomie Botanical Garden with the Baroque building in the background. {Image source : ExtraPrimaGood}

Now this old baroque building is one of the tourist attraction in Ingolstadt which holds an enigma up to this day.

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View of the Old Anatomy and Herb garden-Hortus medico botanicus.

Fast forward to current times, the Deutsches Medizinhistorisches Museum (German Museum of Medical History) shows the  unique collection of medical and surgical exhibits from various continents and periods in the “Alte Anatomie” (Old Anatomy). The herb garden- Hortus medico botanicus contains an abundance of around 250 kinds of medicinal plants. The plants are selected firstly on the basis of their historic and present day psychotherapeutic importance and secondly on which drug can be extracted from them. The garden served as a scientific show garden imparting medico-botanical information on a wide range of indigenous and Mediterranean medicinal plants. I found out that some of the plants here are poisonous ( as it was properly labelled) and yet used to create medicine to cure diseases and for study purposes. The whole garden is therapeutic sight, right in the center of the city. I saw the prominent Opium poppy, passion-flower,Jimson weed, and so much more.

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Alte Anatomie Botanical Garden

In the reception, you will be handed out a remote control and headphones where you can have an audio tour while exploring the  Scent and touch garden, which is  also accessible for people with disabilities.Included in the renovation was a polished hip cafe just before the entrance of the garden. You can have some bread, pastry, and threats while enjoying a glass of wine, beer or coffee while enjoying the serene garden views.

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Lavender alley

As we walked through the Anatomiestr. , in the garden and in the extension building,my mind wonders that based from the novel, it is the same streets where the monster walked away and eventually fled into the wilderness. From above you can see the Liebfraunmünster towers, the old  gable rustic houses,and from this location, Ingolstadt still holds a mystery and enigma.

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Hortus Medico-Botanicus garden in Alte Anatomie

I didn’t see any fragment of the horrific imagery or personification of Frankenstein in the Alte Anatomie but rather a place bound with rich medical history that contributes to the advancement of medical field today. I didn’t know that knowing the story of Frankenstein would lead me to learn about the rich history of the place where we live now. In fact, if you wanted to learn more about the life of Dr.Frankenstein, there is a special tour for this. The story of Frankenstein is something that is only in Ingolstadt &  The Frankenstein Mystery Tour is specifically arranged by the Ingolstadt Tourismus and runs from August to October.This is a very interesting one-of a kind tour that you can have in your life if you are fond of such things.

Tell me, what’s your favorite Halloween character?

Have you ever wonder about the stories behind the famous Horror characters that you like?

Happy Halloween everyone! have fun &  and don’t forget to follow our Expat stories by clicking the follow button below!

 

 

Servus! How to say Hello in Bavaria

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It’s  everyone’s instinct to say Hello or Hi to try to interact with others. But how to say it?Whether you are just a visiting tourist, paying visits to relatives or an Expat trying to fit in,these welcome greetings are great revelations of their culture.

I’m a new Expat here in Bavaria, and sure thing, from the first day, I faced the dilemma of how do I greet someone , either out of politeness or being friendly. Living in the Middle East for 8 years, I am used to greeting people with ‘Salam’ almost all the time and that’s it.  Aren’t Germans  cold, reserve and not-so-friendly, top of it that they seldom initiate a small talk? Absolutely not!

One morning while walking around our neighborhood,I was greeted by a man working on his garden in a rather friendly voice “Servus!”Of course I looked back at him and I replied in my timid voice “Hello!”Sure thing He knows that I’m a foreigner because I don’t look like German. A bit further, some cyclist passed ahead of me and said “ Grüss Gott!” While entering grocery shops, I was greeted by fellow shoppers “Grüss Gott!” and while checking out, the cashier repeated these phrase once again. Slowly it sinked into me, Welcome to Bavarian hospitality.

So how does anyone say Hello in Bavaria? Although Germans have a universal way of Saying “Hallo” as greetings, Here in Bavaria, it’s different.Don’t ask me why, they are just different.

Here are typical Bavarian greeting to know and when to use it on appropriate situations.

Grüss Gott:   Knowing that Bavaria is a rather conservative region compared to other parts of Germany, you will hear these words more often as you walked into the streets or just doing errands and close encounters with locals. Grüss Gott is the favourite of catholic housewives aged 40 and above, of which there are many in Bavaria. Very formal. Use it when greeting people you don’t know, or ones that you are meeting for the first time, such as your new landlord or boss. Laughed at by northern Germans, who don’t seem to like Bavarians very much. That feeling is mutual.

Servus: Say it to friends – or to someone you don’t know at your own peril. Informal. Servus is most often used between people who know each other well enough to say “Du” to each other. Servus is also widely used in Austria.

Hallo: This is the German way of saying hello. Don’t force your slang English way or American accent , just say it the Germans way. Therefore, it is not strictly Bavarian. Bavarians don’t really do German. If you really want to be one of the locals, then see above.

I noticed that Bavarians seldom say Guten Tag (good day) in Bavaria too. Instead they just shout from their lungs “Morgen” ( Morning)  or ” Schön Tag” ( Nice day !)

If you say Hi, you will just be greeted back with blank stare since this is the quickest way to annoy Germans. I’m not kidding, only foreigners used this word.

As I told you, it’s different here in Bavaria. 🙂

 

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Surprising things that German parents do

 

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This is a typical sight in Germany. Mama on the bike and baby on board in bike seat. Photo credit to : Young Germany / Michael Reichel

The first time I saw in Amsterdam a mother cycling with her 2 kids inside a rather impressive ‘ BakfietsBakfiets‘ and’ Kinderzitje’ ( Kid’s seat attached on the rear end of a bike)  I almost shrieked and laughed! How could this be,  in Philippines, Bakfiets or the modern SUV in Holland could resemble much like the Kariton  dragged by an animal ( mostly carabao)  with the harvest from the farm, mostly sacks of rice. In the fields, kids play  while riding it, but purely for fun. In Holland, it’s functional. Bakfiets are attached to a bike and in it, is your child, along with bag of  groceries, plants, toys, you name it, it’s all in there! Such a surprising part of Dutch culture that Dutch are known for.

Here in Germany, I saw something else. As I roamed the streets getting to know our neighborhood, I saw and witnessed more and more surprising things about Parenthood that only German parents do with their kids.  To tell you frankly, before coming to Europe, I thought  Germans are strict, cold, and severe people, let alone being parents, but I was completely mistaken. Here are the reasons why ignorance doesn’t pay and why I love just how  German Parents doing it, the German way.

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Why ‘ free play’ is important in German kids.

Play comes first (until 6 years old!)

I saw from my friend’s feed that their toddlers & pre- schoolers are already being taught how to scribble, write, draw, count and do the academic side of learning. Do you know what German  Kindergarten kids do ?

They play, play & play.

As I was applying for a space for my daughter in a Krippe  & Kindergartens , we were invited to visit and have a look at their school and this is where I got the whole picture of playing as the best form of learning for toddlers until 6 yrs. of age here. Kindergartens  in Germany are based on the concept that  learning is a game of mind (or  lernen ist ein spiel der sinne).

While Kindergarten normally starts at the age of 3, most parents who are urged to go back to work immediately can already put their child ( from 6 mos) in a Krippe or Kita. I saw that the kindergarten is full of different play-areas, fun games and interactive media for kids to just play while learning. Learning to  read, write and count is not being pushed. I was shocked at same time  totally impressed to see a tiny 2-year-old toddler struggle to put on her socks and jacket in the corridor, all by herself. All kindergartens have a spacious outdoor playground with sand pits, climbing areas, ball pits, slides and natural maze that kids can enjoy free-play,while having fun! When they get tired, they have a nap room.

Most kindergarten kids are taken out for a walk touring around the city or just a walk in the woods for an outdoor learning. They also visit nearby playgrounds to play, outside their classrooms. They really give a whole new meaning for playing while learning.

As they say, You are only 3 once in your life, so I find this whole thing of “unstructured playing” very beneficial. Seriously, being a kid is more fun in Germany!

Take their kids Outside-Everyday!

Germans just love the outdoors so they take the kids outside everyday. According to a German saying “there is no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing” which sounds logical to me. The value of outside time is promoted in the schools, hence the “garten” in Kindergarten. It’s also obvious in Germany’s numerous playgrounds. In our neighborhood alone, you can go to 3 different playgrounds within 2 hours!  No matter how cold and grey it gets, parents still bundle their kids up and take them to the park, or send them out on their own. I see babies napping in the forest, parks and in the busy streets. Kids are taught subconsciously the value of nature to overall well-being. Walking and strolling everyday is part of every family’s routine.

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Enjoying outdoors

Freedom and Independency is encouraged as early as age of 2

Along the streets you see mothers walking with their kids on their walking bike at a very young age. Almost still toddling and yet learning how to balance and to pedal the bike. It’s not unusual to see toddlers already cycling at the age of 2.5 y/o and preschoolers cycling going to school. When they eventually learned to cycle, they took them cycling almost everywhere. German parents instill in the minds of their kids to be independent by equipping them with skills to explore by themselves,alone & unsupervised. As research have proved that walking around without parental supervision, or “independent mobility”  is good for kids. Nobody follows a kid in the playground. If you see a mother following wherever her kids go, then she’s a foreigner! I tell you, this is what surprised me the most, I am the only mother who runs after my daughter while all the other mothers are just sitting in the bench.

In the parks & playground, mothers are often drinking tea, coffee and chatting with their friends while they let their kids climb and play. They are so lax in parenting because the safety measures and security is highly efficient. They already removed all the risks even before a child touches what’s in the play areas. Playgrounds are very safe for kids, mostly made with wood, with sand and plastics are mostly omnipresent.

Giving them Bikes instead of iPad or Playstation

German parents give less regard on tech gadgets to entertain kids such as iPad or Playstation or XBox , psp etc. I seldom see kids playing with iPad or computer games. This is because of great emphasis on playing outdoors. Almost everyone owns a  Bike carrier, kid’s seat and a big part of toddler life is owning a kid’s bike. Why? because it promotes being active, functional & again, independency.

If the Dutch  have Bakfiets, then Germans have  their carriers. Of course, take it on German efficiency. I  observed that  kids are brought into an early exposure to be part of the society. The kids are tucked into their carrier, in a kid’s seat at the back of the bike or in a stroller and off they go in everyday life. There is no excuse for German parents for not bringing their kids along. I love the fact that having a kid in Germany shows that a child is not an excess baggage that you bring along with your chores or errands. Add up the efficient transport system then parents doesn’t need to worry about bringing along a baby in a stroller. Even if public transportation isn’t your thing, Germany is a very bike-friendly country.  Even if with kids.  Especially with kids.

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My daughter enjoys the limitless fun in one of the Wasserspielplatz in Germany.

Bringing their kids to Biergarten

German parents knows how to enjoy  before and after the baby comes. We all know that they love (adore)  beer and Oktoberfest. I was shocked to see locals bring along their kids while they socialize, drink beer and relax.In our place alone, you can find Biergartens almost in every corner. Nowadays they are transformed  into a great family destination. Who doesn’t want to do things as a family on a Friday night?

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German kids are exposed to responsible drinking at an early stage since Beer is a big part of their culture. Parents don’t get wasted just because they go to a Biergarten. (Photo credit to ExtraPrimaGood)

Biergartens have become a go-to destination for family outings, play dates and toddler birthdays. On weekend afternoons, many transform into Gymboree-like spaces with multiple brews on tap. If beer is not your thing, then don’t worry, there are juices, lemonades and hearty bites for you. The great thing is, having a kid doesn’t hinder your social life.

What do you think of German parenting?

Do you think you can raise your own child the German way?

 

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